50 Amazing Homemade Organic Popsicle Recipes & Ideas

With sunny days on the way it’s easy to get ice pop fever. In the last two posts we looked at the benefits of homemade popsicles and saw some great non-toxic popsicle molds. Now it’s time to look at some cool popsicle recipes.

My favorite ice pop flavors are root beer, tangerine juice, watermelon and lemon ice tea – not all together! I’m pretty boring though; there are many more amazing ice pop flavors you can make.

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Tips for making the best popsicles: I’ve been making homemade ice pops for myself and son Cedar for years. Over said years we’ve figured out some helpful tips, such as…

  • Go organic. In the recipes below I don’t say “organic this” and “organic that” but I do mean organic when possible. If you find a recipe that looks good just switch out conventional ingredients for organic.
  • Leave room at the top of your mold, because all fluids expand a bit when freezing.
  • Allow fizzy liquids, like soda water or root beer, to sit a while and de-fizz before freezing, so they’re less likely to bubble over in the molds.
  • Make sure you’ve cleared enough room in the freezer. I’m always making pops then realizing, darn, I didn’t clear a space for them.
  • Juice and tea both freeze REALLY rock hard. The only way to really get juice or tea to freeze softer is to add more sweetener or less water. For example, if you’re going to make apple juice pops, and you’re using organic concentrate, make the apple juice with a cup less water. A little pureed melon in a pop will also help cut the rock hard texture down.
  • If you freeze ice cream textured treats use the right molds. These would be push pop style, not traditional molds. I offered some push pop mold ideas in the non-toxic popsicle molds post.
  • Write down ingredients you use in your ice pop creations. The only thing worse than a terrible ice pop flavor idea, is the best flavor idea ever that you can’t remember how to make.
  • You can add fun stuff to your ice pops like edible flowers, nuts, candy sprinkles, fruit slices, and more.

I’ve collected (or experimented with) a ton of ice pop flavors. Some freeze hard, some freeze slushy, some are super sweet and some are delicately flavored. You have to play around with your own ingredients to see what your family likes. However, there are enough ideas here to keep you busy for a while. Now grab the kids and freeze up some fun in your kitchen.

50 Amazing Homemade Popsicle Recipes (and other ideas about good stuff to freeze)

1) Apricot – Mix 2 cups organic apricot juice with 1/2 cup organic soy milk (or organic skim milk) and freeze.

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2) Pomegranate Apple Pops (shown above) – via the Pops! Icy Treats for Everyone website – visit to see many other amazing ideas.

3) Homemade chai tea pops.

4) Creamy root beer popsicles. Note you can make basic root beer pops too, but it’ll fizz too much and create a weird airy pop if you just open a can, pour and freeze. Instead, open a can of root beer, let it sit in the fridge for a day til flat. Then pour into molds and freeze.

5) A tablespoon of organic raspberry or blackberry jam mixed with water or milk or juice to thin it out. This is nice for that last bit of jam in the jar.

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6) Lavender sorbet or try a milk & honey lavender sorbet mix.

7) Pineapple and carrot juice with some actual pineapple bits.

8 ) Honeyed Peach and Blueberry Pops

9) Plain old carrot juice – or add in some wheatgrass juice if you grow some. Or if you want it more smoothie textured, see a great carrot smoothie recipe.

10) Smashed strawberries and blueberries – this works better with fresh berries; simply mash them up in a bowl, smoosh into molds, freeze.

11) Rocky Road Fudge Pops.

12) Green smoothie pop – puree 1 1/2 cups plain almond milk, organic skim milk, soy milk, or so on (any old milk you like) with 1/2 cups packed baby spinach with the stems removed and 1 1/2 cups frozen or fresh cherries or mixed berries. Make sure it’s blended well, pour into molds, freeze.

13) Lemon raspberry yogurt pops.

14) White peach and flower smoothie – pretty colors shine in this ice pop mixture.

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15) Organic pregnancy pop – Brew up some strong organic ginger tea. Mix in some honey (just a bit) and freeze. Ginger pops not only taste great but ginger helps fight morning sickness as well.

16) Apricot Mango – one of Cedar’s favorite juice flavors and it also makes excellent pops.

17) Homemade organic lemonade or limeade.

18) “Glitter” pops – My son Cedar likes these these. Sadly, they take some time so I don’t make them often, but they’re fun. Sprinkle colored sugar into your mold. Fill the mold half way with water. Freeze a while. Sprinkle more colored sugar in. Add more water. Freeze. I can’t figure out how to simply mix the sugar in because it’ll melt and or sink to the bottom. These pops look more glittery if you make them with yogurt – the sugar doesn’t dissolve much in yogurt. Cedar loves ice though. So… we make them with water.

19) Dandelion smoothie pop.

20) Blueberry and Vanilla Parfait Pops.

21) Maraschino-lemonade pops.

22) Organic applesauce – sometimes thick applesauce needs to be mixed with a little water or it freezes funny.

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23) Coffee pops – I’m a coffee freak so plain old coffee with lots of cream and sugar, frozen up in molds is fine with me. However, if you want to get super fancy you can add some organic chocolate syrup or even try a homemade Frappuccino recipe then freeze it.

24) Organic fudge pops.

25) Tangerine juice – tangerine lime is really good too.

26) Red beans and coconut.

27) Blend 6 oz fresh raspberries, 1 1/2 cup plain or vanilla organic yogurt, 3/4 cup water and mint (either a handful of fresh mint leaves, or 2 tsp mint syrup) together well and freeze.

28) Blackberry ice cream for push pop style treats.

29) Swirled pudding pops – grab any two flavors of pudding you like, pour into mold, then swirl the pudding flavors together with a knife before freezing. Need an homemade organic chocolate pudding recipe?

30) Strawberry orange juice jello pops – not vegan.

31) Honeydew lime.

32) Fresh pureed peaches, a tablespoon of honey, and whole small wild blueberries. Mix & freeze.

33) Rose and Champagne Sorbet – I have not made this recipe as pops, so I’m not sure how they’d turn out, but if they did work out I think it’s an awesome idea for a green summer wedding. I’m considering trying it with a cheap champagne first to see if the taste comes through. This one is not so kid-friendly obviously.

34) Brew strong green tea, mix in honey, some sugar and freeze.

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35) Tomato and Avocado Popsicles (shown above) – a savory ice pop with layers that are too much work for the everyday ice pop lover, but these would make a fab and unique summer party treat.

36) Strawberry Yogurt Smoothie Pops.

37) Mashed bananas, a dash of milk, peanut butter, and chocolate sauce – (mix smooth & freeze).

38) Mango Kulfi.

39) Jello pops with fruit bits. I used to think there was some big secret to making jello pops. There’s not. You make the jello and add some fruit (I like chopped cherries) then you pour it into molds. I think the texture is a little funny but Cedar likes them. If you’re vegan or just don’t want commercial gelatin, you can find vegan jello-type products at most natural grocers.

40) Pureed watermelon mixed with white grape juice.

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41) Pink grapefruit, vanilla ice cream & mint pop.

42) Sweet potato pops – cook, mash, mix smooth (adding some soy milk or apple juice to thin it out), sprinkle in a little nutmeg, freeze. These are really strange but good – no joke. I actually found this by accident. I used to make homemade baby food when Cedar was little and he loved sweet potatoes so I’d make a bunch of sweet potato puree at a time and freeze it. One day I had my frozen baby food cubes out and he grabbed one and started licking it. Weird, but, oh well. It’s a healthy pop.

43) Banana & pomegranate

44) Chamomile sun tea pops – just like it sounds. Make sun tea & freeze. I love lemon ice sun tea pops too but I add sugar or honey to mine.

45) Apple cranberry smoothie pops.

46) PLAIN WATER – plain water is way fun to freeze. Every kid I know likes plain ice pops and water is important, we need lots of it to stay healthy. Also, if you’re having a summer picnic, you can make plain water pops with beautiful tiny edible flowers, flower petals, small whole berries, or whole herb leaves in them. Stick them in a bucket of cubed ice to serve and everyone will think you’re some sort of Martha Stewart genius. I’m serious. Make some. People will fawn over you… for freezing water. Go figure.

47) Flavor infused water pops – better than plain water in my opinion. Grab a large mason jar, or regular old juice pitcher. Fill it with H2O, add sliced citrus fruit (one whole fruit should do it), and let it sit in your fridge for a day. Pour into molds, freeze.

48) Fruity creamy swirly yogurt pops.

49) Plum, melon, spinach & celery pops – 2 plums, 2.5 cups of pureed watermelon, 2 cups fresh baby spinach, 2 celery stalk, and about one cup water or light flavored juice. Blend all the produce (not including liquid) to death. Add in enough liquid to get a thick smoothie-like texture, pour into molds, freeze.

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50) Herbal pops – Herbal pops are amazing and if you do your research first you can make them with medicinal qualities which is excellent for sick kids (or you). You can use lavender, thyme, basil, and more – really any herb. You’d be surprised at some of the tasty ice pops herbs make. IF you’re nervous try a sample first by making herbal ice cubes. Then you have less waste than whole pops.

To make a basic herbal ice pop mix you can make herbal tea by boiling herbs in a few cups of water for a good long while on your stove and use the liquid for your pops. Or try the alternative sugar method below.

The sugar method –  pound herbs down with a pestle and mortar (or food processor). Add an ounce of super fine sugar and pound to make a paste. Next, boil a liter of water with about 2 ounces of super fine sugar for five minutes. Add the juice of two lemons or not – this step depends on what you’re trying to create. You can add orange juice, lime, etc. You could even just add more water or some saved tea. Mix the herb mixture and the water mixture together. Stir well with a whisk. Cool down before filling your molds.

Learn more…

To score more ice pop flavor ideas just look through your kitchen, your cookbooks, or your garden and experiment like mad. You might also want to visit People’s Pops. These folks make ice pops. Their blog is a little sketchy (light on posts) but from what I can tell they’re planning some sort of ice pop world takeover and they always post the oddest flavor ideas like rhubarbalicious, cherry & cocoa, cantaloupe & basil and more. It’s a good place to gain ideas.

If you come up with a super amazing ice pop flavor come back and let me know in the comments.

Other ideas…

 

[Lead images via Flickr]

 

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Comments

  1. Rita Bock says

    What wonderful recipes for all of my grandchildren. However my 5 adult girls are coming for a vacation and I want to try to make a special popsicle with alittle vodka or rum for fun for them. Everyone tells me it won’t freeze. Do you have any ideas I bought the molds from Target. Have a great 4th of July. Rita

  2. Jennifer says

    I should do a post on something adult minded like that – but honestly I’m not a hard alcohol drinker; just never liked the taste. So I’m not sure what would freeze or not. I like beer, but beer pops sound kind of blah. One pop recipe I saw before that looked ok (for folks who like alcohol) are these Margarita Ice Pops – http://www.hostessblog.com/2008/04/margarita-ice-pops/. That’s all I’ve got though. A quick search around Google should turn up some more ideas.

  3. says

    Hey Jennifer,

    I love your popsicle recipes and can’t wait to try them out for my kiddos but I was surprised to see that you had soy milk and skim milk as options for your popsicles. Soy is actually a terrible food choice for anyone, especially childre.. Children and adults really do need good sources of fat in their diet and skim milk is so processed and bastardized its little more than milky water with vitamins added back into it because they’re so damaged by the homogenization and pasteurization. The government has been trying to push a low/no fat diet for years and it has served to make us more obese and unhealthier. I am not writing this to flame you or cause any problems, I am all about feeding my children the very best nutrient dense food and sometimes I can’t help myself but share what I’ve learned. The other day I ended up talking with another mom about grassfed cultured butter in whole foods! lol. Here is a link with extensive science backed information on the problems with soy products: http://www.westonaprice.org/soy-alert. The Weston A. Price Foundation has a plethora of information on real milk and more.

  4. Megs  says

    This is such a cute website about Popsicles! :) the Lord has obviously called you to educate people about Popsicles! Haha I am lovin your site! I even bookmarked it on my iPod! I am going try most of these recipes! Thanks! :)
    –Megs

  5. Jennifer says

    @Jen Flickinger – I don’t agree that soy is terrible. I do think non-organic soy is terrible. I know some people don’t like soy at all though, I just don’t happen to be one of them. Soy studies, like most food studies go back and fourth, over and over, saying soy is a danger, oh wait, it’s safe and back again. In my opinion, anything is likely okay, so long as it’s in moderation. We eat soy, but not loads of it, just like we wouldn’t eat loads of anything else.

    Also, I don’t agree that the government trying to push a low/no fat diet is what has caused the obesity epidemic. I think the gov is in part responsible – for example, they could run more public service ads about how and what to eat, and force medical professionals to tell people when they’re an unhealthy weight. BUT science shows that calories in, calories out is the cause of weight gain (or not). Some studies show that chemicals may cause changes that may help people gain weight, but the only conclusive evidence, right now, is calories in calories out. There are 146 calories in a cup of whole milk and only 80 in a cup of fat free, so if people were actually drinking milk, this would be a good way to cut calories and maintain a healthy weight.

    That said, people aren’t drinking much milk, so it’s kind of a moot point. See NPR’s obesity by the numbers chart to see how little milk we’re drinking.

    Thanks for your comment though – you don’t sound like you’re flaming at all. It’s perfect to have your own opinions. Frankly, if more people had nutrition opinions, I doubt one in three Americans would be overweight.

  6. Jennifer says

    @Megs – thanks so much for reading and bookmarking :) hope you find some recipes you adore here.

  7. Nikki says

    I just bought my first popsicle molds (Tovolo Blue Rocket Pop) this past weekend and made popsicles for me & my 10yr old nephews (twins). I used our favorite smoothie recipe and froze it. It was a HUGE hit with them! :) I love being able to give them this “treat” any time, knowing it’s healthy. It’s great to know & control exactly what gets put into it. We used fresh strawberries, blueberries, & bananas with a splash of V8 V-Fusion Strawberry Banana juice. Pureed it in a blender and poured it in the molds. The texture is great, not real hard and it doesn’t melt fast. Now I need to experiment with more recipes! :)

  8. Allergy prone daughter says

    @ Jen Flickinger. My daughter is allergic to cow’s milk and soy is the next best milk to give her for nutrients. Or says the doctor anyways. So, I really appreciate websites such as these that include soy milk recipes.

  9. andi says

    What great recipes… and i dont agree at all about the comments made about soy milk and low fat milk…. my family has allergies to dairy proteins and soy milk is the option and we have a family member that cant break down fats properly and needs skimmed milk. it is great that these products are avaliable to us and poeple should not force their negative opinions towards these products on other people :) made some low fat lactose free yoghurt pops today and there are fab !!!! :)

  10. Jennifer Flickinger says

    I don’t have the time or energy, physical or emotional, to get super invested in a comment debate on the healthiness of soy and skim milk. I am a little surprised though to see how emotionally charged people get over something as simple as suggesting a different theory on food. My daughter cannot tolerate any milk :( so I make her coconut milk at home to drink and use that instead of dairy most of the time. My husband is lactose intolerant in a different way than my daughter but does great on raw milk. In my comment I was very clear to say that I love to share what I’ve learned for the benefit of others, not to spew negative soy hate =p That said, it is absolutely worth it to look into the more information about soy. Unferemented soy, as is consumed in America, is full of phytoestrogens which mimic estrogen in our bodies, it is goiterogenic so it suppresses normal thyroid function, and its packed with anti-nutrients which inhibit mineral absorption. It isn’t a whole food, its very processed. Anyways, I’m not an expert, I’m a busy mom of twins, a baby and I’m pregnant with my fourth little bundle. I love feeding my kids the best food that I can just like everyone else. My only suggestion is to do a little digging about soy. Most of us are familiar w http://www.mercola.com, he has an entire report on soy as do many others. I’m a skeptic, big time, but there is enough proof out there for me that soy isn’t a health food at all.

  11. Jill says

    Have you ever added anything to help keep them from having too large of ice crystals – like guar gum or carob bean gum?

Trackbacks

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